How and Why We Measure Productivity

One of the best ways of improving employee performance is through productivity measurement. There are multiple reasons for this. Firstly, measurement provides quantitative and qualitative evidence on whether an employee is meeting the targets set by the company. Also, in relation to an employee’s job and their set tasks, measures have the potential to improve understanding of the concepts of quality, productivity and continuous improvement. It should be noted however that in measuring productivity, a lot depends on the approach the organisation takes to measure performance. If the right activities, behaviours and outcomes are captured through the approach, they can be effective motivational tools for employees as they demonstrate desired behaviours and important strategic tactics adopted by the organisation.

In their article, ‘Use Measures to Promote a Culture of Quality- Measures can help embed quality into the way employees work and think’, the American Productivity and Quality Centre (APQC) state, ‘Enterprise leaders cannot dictate  or mandate quality, but they can influence the culture of quality for their staff’.

So saying, within any organisation, a culture of productivity measurement should be cultivated in which a compass of performance is set by developing objectives, goals and targets. An organisation should then measure its performance in relation to these targets, as it is through them that managers are able to delegate performance expectations to their staff.  Today, performance measurement and the use of key performance indicators are considered organisation competencies and thus, it is expected that all managers implement them, especially those within human resources. HR Managers are accountable for the significant investments made by a company in its employees and therefore are required to be on top of their game when strategic questions are asked. There are differing ways that they can do this, but some of the most notable include;

 Recruitment

The recruitment process is expected to be led by managers these days. Their job in doing so is to process and participate in the development of job descriptions which accurately reflect the duties to be performed by the employee and which meet organisation targets. They must also have a system for monitoring performance on a monthly and quarterly basis and maintaining the link between strategy and operations.

Training Needs Analysis and On-the-job Training

In addition to having an assessment of their staff’s performance, managers and line supervisors must be able to provide researched advice on the training needs of their staff to match the future talent requirements of the organisation. In some cases, they are expected to deliver the training or know where to source the most appropriate technical and general training.

Employee engagement and Motivation

Employees now expect that the organisational climate will meet employees own needs and motivate them to perform their duties within or even exceeding the expectations of the organisation.

Return on Investment

Management will be keen to know whether the investment made in salaries paid, training conducted and occupational safety standards maintained is indeed yielding results evidenced by increased output, sales and profitability. The HR practitioner will be expected to conduct the analysis, using key performance indicators and other types of trend analysis, to respond to the questions.

It is apparent that whether the central focus is a local company or a nation at large, a measurement of productivity must take place. It is an evidence based activity which is vital to assessing whether or not goals and objectives are being achieved. Even though viewed at different levels, company managers and bodies such as the NCPC are seen as being accountable for the process of productivity measurement.

However, even though a lot of responsibility does fall on their shoulders it is necessary for each individual in society to see productivity measures as being a concept which can be implemented a little closer to home.  It is important that a culture of measurement is entrenched within the population. This is essential, so that whether at work or at play each member of society should be able to measure and assess their own performance in helping to build a productive nation.

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

 

Are Your Meetings Productive ?

In today’s competitive business environment productivity is key to the success of enterprises. It is an essential element in helping any firm grow. In light of this, businesses should continuously work towards maintaining high levels of productivity. However, there are some day-to -day business activities that may work against this objective. One such activity is an unproductive business meeting.

In his article, ‘Why Meetings Kill Productivity’, author, businessman and motivational speaker Ray Williams states, ‘How often have you sat through a meeting and said to yourself, “what a waste of time, I could be doing something better!”  Meetings take up an ever-increasing amount of employees’, and particularly managers’ time. My experience in working with executives and managers is that 40-50 percent of their time is taken up with meetings, that either they call, or have to attend. Which leaves precious little time left to actually get work done.’

However contrary to Williams’ opinion, meetings do not have to be completely unproductive. A poorly managed meeting does have the potential to subtract valuable time of the day. On the other hand, if well planned and executed, a meeting can prove to be a fundamental component of a productive day.

Mihir Patkar, a frequent contributor to the ‘lifehaker’ site, in his post ‘How to Have a Meeting That Isn’t a Complete Waste of Time’ details some practices that can ensure that meetings are productive. Prior to any gathering, he mentions that there are three W’s that need to be addressed, that is: when, who and why.

  • Why- It is essential that before any meeting is called, the meeting leader should know why the meeting is called. If this is not clear, nothing constructive will be gained from the meeting. Patkar continues ‘A meeting shouldn’t be the place where you brainstorm ideas, you need to tell the attendees to do that in advance and show up with a clear list for discussion. Similarly, the meeting organizer should send the required reading at least three days in advance, and make it concise enough so that everyone can actually read it before they show up.’
  • Who- Remember that not every individual needs to be present at every meeting. If a meeting does not require a contribution from a certain individual but this party wishes to be kept informed of the discussion; consider the option of sending the minutes after the gathering. If you are the one invited to the meeting and your workload is heavy, there are certain questions that you can ask the person inviting you that can determine whether you really need to be a part of the occurrence or not. Such questions include, ‘Will all in attendance be called on to make decisions?’ and ‘Are you going to ask for something at the end?’ Depending on the answers received one can determine whether or not your presence is needed.
  • When- Patkar goes on, ‘Coordinating with multiple people is difficult, but not impossible. Online meeting scheduling service, ’When Is Good’ analysed 100,000 responses to 34,000 events and found that Tuesdays at 3pm is the most agreeable meeting time for most people. Of course, you don’t need to stick to that, coordinate and find out your own most agreeable time. It is also wise to remember that the length of the meeting is important too.’

Once the meeting is scheduled and participants are invited, the meeting must be focused.  Meetings can go off-track easily, and hence, time and energy can be wasted discussing matters which are not on the agenda. Productivity guru Merlin Mann says that each meeting needs a designated “parent” who steers the meeting responsibly.

In addition, it is important to ensure that extra writing material is available in case this is needed by participants. Participants should be encouraged to take notes. Notes help clarify thoughts and are also useful in post-meeting discussions. It is also essential to have a person designated to take the minutes of the meeting. Minutes provide a record of the discussion that can be mailed out to persons who need to be kept informed.

After the meeting, participants should benefit from the experience and there should be an understanding of all future plans. Patkar states, ‘In his article- “Seven Imperatives to Keep Meetings on Track”, Robert C. Pozen, Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School, says there are three questions that should be asked at the end of each meeting. These questions include:

  • What do we see as the next steps?
  • Who should take responsibility for them?
  • And what should the timeframe be?

The answers to these questions by each participant, should be recorded and sent out. In doing so it will confirm everyone from the meeting is on the same page. It will also provide accountability since no one can say they weren’t sure or didn’t remember what happened.’

Business meetings cannot and should not be avoided when they are necessary, but as is evident, there are certain things that can be done to make a meeting productive.

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

 

Mental Health and Its Impact on Productivity

Everyone has the right to employment in conditions of security, equity, freedom and human dignity. For persons with mental health problems, achieving this right is a challenge.

According to the World Health Organization (2001), mental health is defined as ‘a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community’. However, in today’s workforce many people seem to be plagued by this disease and it is often overlooked as they are usually hidden by individuals in the workplace. For people suffering from mental illness, social exclusion is often the hardest barrier to overcome and is usually associated with feelings of shame, fear and rejection. Therefore, the stigma that is attached to having a psychiatric disorder dissuades most from admitting to its existence. There is also a reluctance to seek treatment out of fear that it could result in job loss.

As a result, mental health disorders often go unrecognised and untreated. This is not only detrimental to an individual’s health and career but it also influences productivity in the workplace. Mental illnesses have a huge effect on interpersonal relationships at work. People who suffer from mental illness may withdraw from others, act in unexpected ways or take a lot of time off. This can therefore strain relationships with supervisors and co-workers.

Employee performance, rates of illness, absenteeism, accidents and staff turnover are all affected by employees’ mental health status.

Treatment, if applied could ultimately alleviate symptoms for the employee and improve job performance. However, accomplishing these aims, especially in St. Lucia, will require a shift in attitudes as they relate to the nature of mental health disorder. Common mental health problems that can be found in the workplace include depression, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety. The symptoms of which are all highly documented, but they tend to manifest differently at work. Although, effective mental health services are multidimensional, the workplace is an appropriate environment in which to educate individuals and raise their awareness on mental health. It is highly suggested that companies acknowledge and invest in the mental health of their employees. Not only for the sake of their employed workforce but also for the company. When organisations focus on the practical things that can be done to alleviate mental illness in the workplace the numbers of hours worked and productivity improves. Therefore, in the long term, costs spent on mental health care may represent an investment that will pay off- not only in healthier employees, but also for the company’s financial health.

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

Team Diversity and Your Competitive Edge

It takes a lot to be a competitive company within the global marketplace. From focusing on customer values, to being innovative with new processes, services and products. It is hard work maintaining a competitive edge! To remain ahead of the competition, supervisors must be attentive to all aspects involved in making the company a success; continuously assessing how each facet functions. 

An element that continuously needs to be assessed is that of the company’s staff. The presence of a variable, competent and capable staff can at times make or break an institution.  Many a time, it is the way in which staff carry out their day to day tasks and implement innovative ideas that guarantees success. However, not all staff members are the same. Individuals often have their own work style and it is an amicable mix of these work styles that often gives a business its distinct competitive edge.

Within her article ‘Your Team May Have Too Many Prioritizers and Planners’ in the Harvard Business Review, author Carson Tate lists the four types of workers needed in a successful company. They are planners, prioritizers, arrangers and visualizers.  Planners and prioritizers can be described as individuals who are analytical, linear and data and detail orientated. They pride themselves on their ability to be undoubtedly organized, precise and committed to honouring deadlines. Whilst arrangers and visualizers are supportive, expressive, and emotionally intelligent big-picture thinkers. They generate ideas and take risks.

In a recent assessment conducted by the Harvard Business Review over 46,000 people were evaluated to identify their personal productivity style. Specific questions were asked to help people to self-analyse and recognise how they think, learn and communicate best. On evaluating the results certain trends were found. Forty-seven percent (47%) of participants were recognised as Prioritizers, whilst thirty-seven percent (37%) illustrated the traits of Planners. These work styles align with the expectations and key drivers of performance in many of today’s leaner, more streamlined organisations, therefore they are a necessity. Easily recognisable for their abilities, prioritizers and planners are usually the most likely to get promoted.

Only 19% of those assessed turned out to be Arrangers, whilst 18% demonstrated Visualizer tendencies. However, companies need people of all types. Due to this Arrangers and Visualizers also have their importance. Think about it, if companies are unable to connect with their customers offering break through products and services, no amount of prioritizing and planning will ensure the long term viability of the company.

Managers and supervisors as leaders need to know and understand their own work style and those of their employees ensuring a balance of thinking and approaches. Realistically, most organisations probably won’t have a team in which Prioritizers, Planners, Arrangers, and Visualizers are all equally represented. However, new people or outside experts can be brought in to bridge the gaps. In preparation for this it is important to find out what work styles the workers in the workplace presently exhibit. By giving each person a new project to work on, their work style can be determined. On receiving information about the new task each staff member will have questions of their own pertaining to it. The questions asked will give some indication as to what category they fall under.

Faced with a new project, for example, Prioritizers would ask:

  • What is the goal?
  • What is the deadline?
  • What data or facts are necessary?
  • What metrics will be used to evaluate success?

Planners would ask:

  • How will the project be delivered?
  • How will the project be completed? Is a project plan necessary?
  • How will information about the project be communicated?

Arrangers would ask:

  • Who are the project stakeholders?
  • Who else needs to be involved?
  • Who can support you in achieving the goals of the project?

Visualizers would ask:

  • What are the gaps between where you are today and where you want to be at the end of the project?
  • Why does this project matter to the team and the organization?
  • What barriers can you foresee that will need to be addressed as you implement this project?

If you’re leading a team that is heavily weighted toward one or two work styles, recognize the value in rebalancing it. Work style diversity is the making of a productive team that will focus on all aspects – the big picture and the details, ideas and execution and purpose and profits.

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

 

Regular Exercise and Your Productive Output

It is a known fact that regular exercise can improve your health. It is key to managing your weight and maintaining healthy organs. But did you know that exercise can make you more productive? How is this possible? Well, the latest research shows that regular exercise can make you happier, smarter, and more energetic.

In his article ‘Exercise Increases Productivity’ within The Huffington Post, Robert Pozen states,

‘A habit of regular exercise will help keep you mentally sharper throughout your entire life. As you age, your body generates fewer and fewer brain cells (a process called neurogenesis). However, early research in mice suggests that exercise can help prevent this slowdown. In other words, by the time they reach their 50s, 60s, and 70s, people who exercise might have more brain cells than their more sedentary peers — giving them a major advantage in the workplace.’

Over a shorter time-frame, regular exercise has been proven to provide energy to the body throughout the day. Our cells contain components called mitochondria, often referred to as the cell’s “power plant.” Mitochondria in turn produces the chemical that our bodies use as energy, known as ATP. Physical exercise stimulates the development of new mitochondria within our cells, so that our bodies produce more ATP over time. This gives us more energy to exert ourselves physically, but it also means more energy for the brain, boosting mental output.

If you do not regularly exercise don’t panic however as it is not necessary to sweat up a storm to achieve these benefits. In a randomized controlled trial, researchers from the University of Georgia split people into three groups: low-intensity exercise, moderate-intensity exercise, and a control group who did not exercise at all.  During the six-week experiment, both “exercise” groups reported growing levels of energy (compared to the control group). Notably, there was no substantial difference in results between the moderate- and low-intensity exercise groups.

This experiment suggests that exercise can make you feel more energized within a few weeks. By contrast, the effect of exercise on your mood is immediate. When we exercise, our body releases several different chemicals within our brain. Collectively these are known as neurotransmitters. Although the mechanisms aren’t fully understood, these neurotransmitters seem to reduce the discomfort of exercise and create the sensation often referred to as “runner’s high.” Yet, despite all of this many people still find it hard to exercise regularly. When this is the case it is often suggested that individuals should organize a group of friends or family members to work out with.

Pozen continues,

‘Fortunately, working out with others is also more fun, as researchers found by studying elite male rowers at Oxford University. The rowers first exercised on a rowing machine in the company of their teammates; the next day, they performed the same workout at the same intensity, but by themselves. After each session, researchers tested the pain tolerance of each of the athletes, finding a higher pain tolerance when the rowers worked out together. The researchers concluded that exercising with others enhances the release of the pain-suppressing (and happiness-inducing) chemicals in your brain.’

Therefore, the evidence is compelling. A modest exercise habit can help keep you sharper into old age, give you more energy to take on the day, and improve your mood, all in all helping to improve your productivity. So stop making excuses, find a group of like-minded peers, and start exercising today!

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

 

Be A Productive Leader

productive-leadership-style

Competition in business is ever increasing and with it comes a high level of expectancy levied at top level officials to break boundaries in innovations and increase business successes. In trying to achieve these successes, many supervisors and managers crack under daily work-related pressures. Although fully aware of their stressful situations, most in an effort to remain committed to fulfilling their mandates, refrain from implementing measures that could alleviate the strain; instead they concede to the notion that certain pressures should be expected when in managerial or supervisory positions.  Reports state that this is the wrong approach! Instead, supervisors should turn to positively charged solutions like implementing ‘The Six D’s’.

 ‘The Six D’s’ is an approach that focuses directly on the everyday actions of the company’s, supervisor. Each ‘D’ is a call to action aimed at reducing the workload of the person in charge whilst increasing the productivity levels of the unit.

  1. The first D in ‘The Six D’s’ is for Delete. Non-relevant company orientated tasks usually carried out by the supervisor should be deleted from their to-do lists. Many continue to carry out these tasks due to force of habit however their time could be better utilised elsewhere.
  2. The following D is for Decline. Most leaders find it hard to decline invitations to meetings. The problem with this being that meetings have a tendency of taking up valuable amounts of time. If a pending meeting does not seem currently relevant or if the invitation received makes it unclear as to what the meeting might be about, it may be better to politely say ‘No’.
  3. The third D is for Delegate. When the options of deleting and declining are not made available it is time to delegate. A successful leader cannot do everything. There are times when a task must be handed over to other staff members.
  4. D is also for Decide. It is said that a good leader is a good decision maker. Such supervisors do not procrastinate or over analyse. Instead, they simply make sure that all high priority goals are identified and allotted the necessary time needed for their completion.
  5. The fifth D is for Design. The redesigning of a process can also aid in greater productivity. A set way of doing something does not always make for a good outcome. If this is the case, it may be time to redesign the process thus resulting in a quality end product.
  6. The final D is for Destroy. It might sound drastic with regards to productivity it is sometimes a necessity. Committing to a plan of action that repeatedly brings about a negative result is pointless. A more productive approach would be to destroy the failing plan and start afresh on a clean slate.

Improving the productivity levels of an organisation is one of the most stressful yet significant challenges that leaders face today.  However, it should be recognised by supervisors that after improving on their own productivity levels they are able to lead by example. The end result being the creation of a highly productive team.  The Six D’s framework is one that can aid in bringing about higher levels of productivity to any organisation. Ultimately this can also bring about a less stressed, more engaged and energised leader.

About the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC)

Established in October 2013, The National Competitiveness and Productivity Council (NCPC) is responsible for the identification of key issues related to competitiveness and productivity in Saint Lucia.

The NCPC and its Technical Secretariat is committed to providing the necessary advocacy and research to produce timely and effective recommendations to policymakers on issues that affect both competitiveness and productivity on island. For more information about productivity or on the NCPC, visit www.stluciancpc.org; www.facebook.com/stluciancpc, call 468-5571/5576 or send an e-mail to stluciancpc@gmail.com

Happy 38th Independence Anniversary St. Lucia!!!

independence-banner-2As Saint Lucia prepares to celebrate her 38th Independence Anniversary under the theme “I am Saint Lucia”, the Secretariat of the National Competitiveness and Productivity Council extends warm patriotic wishes to the Government and people of Saint Lucia.

Wishing you a Happy Independence Day!

#iamsaintlucia #38yearsandcounting #independenceday #ilovesaintlucia #lucianpride #758 #thelandthepeoplethelight